Sicily’s Mount Etna Largest Eruption in Decades: 4 Eruptions in 4 days

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Sicily’s Mount Etna, Europe’s most active volcano, had four eruptions for 4 consecutive days last week, and a peak eruption 2 days ago that was the most spectacular in decades with lava soaring 1,500 meters into the sky.

Sicily’s Mount Etna is active again

Mount Etna is located in Sicily, the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea and one of the 20 regions of Italy. Mount Etna is Europe’s most active, as well as, its highest active volcano at 3,326 metres.

Mount Etna erupted earlier this month, on 3 February, Reuters reported, and again on 16 February, spewing lava and ash into the sky, People reported. There have been several eruptions reported on Mount Etna over the last year. An eruption was reported on 14 December 2020, and another back on 21 March, 2020, that sent a 5 kilometer column about ash into the sky.

The last major eruption of Mount Etna was in 1992.

4 eruptions in 4 days and continuing

On Saturday, Mount Etna had its fourth consecutive eruption within four days, spewing fountains of lava and ash into the sky, sending orange-colored smoke over the Italian town of Paterno. No injuries or deaths were reported from the four eruptions. However, nearby residents reported a “rain of stones,” as they found large chunks of volcanic stones and ash throughout the area, CBN News reported.

But eruptions continued after this consecutive streak. How long the eruptions will continue are anyone’s guess.

The longest continuous streaks of eruptions ever recorded at Mount Etna was in July 1614, when the activity at the volcano lasted 10 years.

Mount Etna lights up the night sky with 1,500 metre lava fountain

In one of Mount Etna’s most spectacular eruptions this week, the largest in the last few decades, on Monday, a fountain soared to a height of 1,500 metres, illuminating the night sky. Mount Etna is Europe’s most active volcano, and Monday’s incandescent magma and a copious shower of ash, reached as far as Catania, The Guardian reported.

Experts say the fireworks spewing from volcano are part of a Strombolian eruption that is among the normal activities of the more than 3,300-metre-high volcano.

Mount Etna’s largest eruption

“This is certainly the strongest explosion in the southern crater that was discovered in 1971,” said Marco Neri, an expert in volcanology and a member of INGV, the Italian national institute for geophysics and volcanology. “We have not seen such high explosions for years but at the moment there is no risk to the population, apart from the smoke that can create breathing problems for a few hours, and the ash that covers buildings and streets.”

Sicily’s Mount Etna Largest Eruption in Decades: 4 Eruptions in 4 days

Sicily’s Mount Etna, Europe’s most active volcano, had four eruptions for 4 consecutive days last week, and a peak eruption 2 days ago that was the most spectacular in decades with lava soaring 1,500 metres into the sky.

Sicily’s Mount Etna is active again

Mount Etna is located in Sicily, the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea and one of the 20 regions of Italy. Mount Etna is Europe’s most active, as well as, its highest active volcano at 3,326 metres.

Mount Etna erupted earlier this month, on 3 February, Reuters reported, and again on 16 February, spewing lava and ash into the sky, People reported. There have been several eruptions reported on Mount Etna over the last year. An eruption was reported on 14 December 2020, and another back on 21 March, 2020, that sent a 5 kilometer column about ash into the sky.

The last major eruption of Mount Etna was in 1992.

4 eruptions in 4 days and continuing

On Saturday, Mount Etna had its fourth consecutive eruption within four days, spewing fountains of lava and ash into the sky, sending orange-colored smoke over the Italian town of Paterno. No injuries or deaths were reported from the four eruptions. However, nearby residents reported a “rain of stones,” as they found large chunks of volcanic stones and ash throughout the area, CBN News reported.

But eruptions continued after this consecutive streak. How long the eruptions will continue are anyone’s guess.

The longest continuous streaks of eruptions ever recorded at Mount Etna was in July 1614, when the activity at the volcano lasted 10 years.

Mount Etna lights up the night sky with 1,500 metre lava fountain

In one of Mount Etna’s most spectacular eruptions this week, the largest in the last few decades, on Monday, a fountain soared to a height of 1,500 metres, illuminating the night sky. Mount Etna is Europe’s most active volcano, and Monday’s incandescent magma and a copious shower of ash, reached as far as Catania, The Guardian reported.

Experts say the fireworks spewing from volcano are part of a Strombolian eruption that is among the normal activities of the more than 3,300-metre-high volcano.

Mount Etna’s largest eruption

“This is certainly the strongest explosion in the southern crater that was discovered in 1971,” said Marco Neri, an expert in volcanology and a member of INGV, the Italian national institute for geophysics and volcanology. “We have not seen such high explosions for years but at the moment there is no risk to the population, apart from the smoke that can create breathing problems for a few hours, and the ash that covers buildings and streets.

Sicily’s Mount Etna, Europe’s most active volcano, had four eruptions for 4 consecutive days last week, and a peak eruption 2 days ago that was the most spectacular in decades with lava soaring 1,500 metres into the sky.

Sicily’s Mount Etna is active again

Mount Etna is located in Sicily, the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea and one of the 20 regions of Italy. Mount Etna is Europe’s most active, as well as, its highest active volcano at 3,326 metres.

Mount Etna erupted earlier this month, on 3 February, Reuters reported, and again on 16 February, spewing lava and ash into the sky, People reported. There have been several eruptions reported on Mount Etna over the last year. An eruption was reported on 14 December 2020, and another back on 21 March, 2020, that sent a 5 kilometer column about ash into the sky.

The last major eruption of Mount Etna was in 1992.

4 eruptions in 4 days and continuing

On Saturday, Mount Etna had its fourth consecutive eruption within four days, spewing fountains of lava and ash into the sky, sending orange-colored smoke over the Italian town of Paterno. No injuries or deaths were reported from the four eruptions. However, nearby residents reported a “rain of stones,” as they found large chunks of volcanic stones and ash throughout the area, CBN News reported.

But eruptions continued after this consecutive streak. How long the eruptions will continue are anyone’s guess.

The longest continuous streaks of eruptions ever recorded at Mount Etna was in July 1614, when the activity at the volcano lasted 10 years.

Mount Etna lights up the night sky with 1,500 metre lava fountain

In one of Mount Etna’s most spectacular eruptions this week, the largest in the last few decades, on Monday, a fountain soared to a height of 1,500 metres, illuminating the night sky. Mount Etna is Europe’s most active volcano, and Monday’s incandescent magma and a copious shower of ash, reached as far as Catania, The Guardian reported.

Experts say the fireworks spewing from volcano are part of a Strombolian eruption that is among the normal activities of the more than 3,300-metre-high volcano.

Mount Etna’s largest eruption

“This is certainly the strongest explosion in the southern crater that was discovered in 1971,” said Marco Neri, an expert in volcanology and a member of INGV, the Italian national institute for geophysics and volcanology. “We have not seen such high explosions for years but at the moment there is no risk to the population, apart from the smoke that can create breathing problems for a few hours, and the ash that covers buildings and streets.”